Bird Info

BASIC CARE GUIDELINES FOR NEW BIRD OWNERS:

DIETMany pet birds actually die of complications resulting from malnutrition.  A diet of seed and water – what most caged birds get- is like bread and water to a person.  Wild birds thrive on an enormous variety of foods – seeds, blossoms, fruits, insects – and your  bird needs the same variety.  Unlike dogs and cats, birds should have table food.  Only half the diet should be starches, and that includes seed, but you can give a bird pasta, potatoes, beans, peas, and corn.  Twenty-five percent or more should be fruits – raisins, apples, pears, melon, you name it – vegetables, cooked or raw.  Go for the darkest and brightest: kale, beets, red peppers, squash.  For hookbill birds—parakeets, cockatiels, parrots and lovebirds—the rest should be  protein:  meat, poultry, fish, eggs (all cooked), cheese, and yogurt.  Baby birds benefit from additional seed, like millet, sunflower seed and/or oat groats for a month or so after purchase.

 

A few cautions:  Birds are susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium.  NEVER feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreak havoc on a bird’s system.  Resist the temptation to overdo junk food or sweets – especially since birds that don’t get a lot of exercise can put on unhealthy excess weight.  Most birds DO NOT require grit.  In the wild, small stones ingested with the food act like teeth in a bird’s digestive tract; this is important since they must gather food, swallow it quickly, and fly off to avoid predators.  Pet birds have the leisure to munch, and studies show that grit offers no benefits.  NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE…..

 

SOCIAL LIFE:  Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s psychological health.  Birds do best when kept in the liveliest room of the house, close to the action  If you buy a single bird, plan to make it a member of the family.  Parakeets, canaries and finches do particularly well in groups; larger birds, which may become very loud with other birds around, do best as one-on-one companions to people.  Do learn to handle your birds;, they’ll suffer less trauma during trips for grooming or medical care if they’re comfortable being held.

 

HABITAT:  No matter how small the bird, choose the largest cage you can, the most important dimension of which should be length.  Birds need space to fly across.  While cages with vertical bars are fine for canaries and finches, hookbills—who enjoy climbing—should live in cages with horizontal ( ¾ ) bars.  Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet—but forget the sandpaper perch covers.  You can get your bird’s toenails and wings clipped at for a small fee at most pet stores or your veterinarian’s.   Also provide wooden ladders and chew toys; birds need and love to chew.  Birds like an occasional bath too.  Offer a bowl of clean water, spray, or take you bird into the shower with you.  Most birds love water—and will sing and whistle as they bathe. Keep your bird out of drafts.  ATTENTION: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

 

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs.  The rewards of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship are well worth the attention to detail.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

MACAWS

So you bought a macaw. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

When raised from a young age and socialized properly Macaws can be quite gentle pets. They are intelligent and curious giants Macaws are fairly easy to train and love performing tricks when rewarded. They also have a great mimicry capability. Although they make wonderful pets. Macaws tend to be very loud and destructive, be aware of this before you bring your new pet home. They require a reasonable amount of attention and need to be handled often

SOCIALIZING YOUR MACAW:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. Macaws are extremely active and require many things to chew on. Macaws should be socialized while young, with many people, toys and a variety of situations. In doing the above the Macaw will not have fear when introduced to a new, unfamiliar situation and will acclimate quickly.

DIET:

Many pet birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get. is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Macaws should be fed a mixture of pellets and large seed as a basis for good nutrition. A half-cup of fruits and vegetables is recommended in addition with their daily diet. Macadamias, walnuts, pecans and almonds are the best nuts. Unlike cats and dogs, birds should have table food. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

Macaws can be susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

HABITAT:

Choose the largest cage possible Macaws are very active and need a lot of space to maneuver throughout their cage. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 4-5 toys they are very curious birds and need many toys to satisfy their busy nature. Wood blocks should be provided, as they chew naturally in the wild. Toys of different materials, shapes and sizes are suggested for a variety of stimulation. When you take your macaw home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

AFRICAN PARROTS

So you bought an African Parrot. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

African Parrots can be shy and cautious at times. They are very active and bold. These birds can make wonderful pets and often bond to a single person if not handled by many people. African Parrots are highly intelligent and have extraordinary mimicry capabilities. Well-stimulated subjects are capable of reasoning and verbal communication.

SOCIALIZING YOUR PARROT:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. African Parrots do best when kept in the liveliest room of the house. They like to be where the action is. African Parrots are very intelligent and should be considered as an addition to your family rather than a pet. Also learn to socialize your parrot they will suffer fewer traumas during trips for grooming or medical care if they are comfortable being held by a variety of people.

DIET:

Many pet birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. African Parrots should be fed a mixture of both pellets and seed and up to 25% of their diet should consist of fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, sprouts. and millet sprays. Unlike cats and dogs, birds should have table food. Baby parrots benefit from additional seed, like millet, sunflower seeds, and nutritional treat seeds for a month or so after purchase. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

African Parrots can be susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

HABITAT:

No matter how small the parrot, choose the largest cage possible. Because of their intelligence African Parrots need a lot of room to stay stimulated. In a small cage a parrot will become inactive and bored; later in life this may lead to feather plucking. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 3-4 toys minimum. Parrots enjoy bells, swings, balls, mirrors, ropes. ladders and wooden toys to chew on. Shred-able toys are always suggested for additional stimulation. When you take your parrot home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time leaving them vulnerable to illness.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

CONURES

So you bought a conure. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

Conures have a bold and outgoing personality that is unlike any other breed. They are very active and playful characters. These birds can make wonderful pets and often bond to a single person if not handled by many people. At times they demand attention and will not stop until given. With proper training and socializing at a young age conures are capable of being wonderful companions. Above all remember these bird’s are loud and screechy and should have a patient caretaker.

SOCIALIZING YOUR CONURE:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. Conures do best when kept in the liveliest room of the house. They like to be where all the action is. Conures are very intelligent and should be considered as an addition to your family rather than a pet. Also learn to socialize your conure; they will suffer fewer traumas during trips for grooming or medical care if they are comfortable being held by a variety of people.

DIET:

Many pct birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Conures should he fed a mixture of both pellets and seed and up to 25% of their diet should consist of fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, sprouts, and millet sprays. Unlike cats and dogs, birds should have table food. Conures benefit from additional seed, like millet, sunflower seeds, and nutritional treat seeds throughout their life. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

Conures can be susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

HABITAT:

No matter how small the conure, choose the largest cage possible. Conures are very active birds and will utilize a lot of space with their playful demeanor. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 3-4 toys minimum. Conures enjoy bells, swings, balls, minors, tents & huts and wooden toys to chew on. Shredable toys are always suggested for additional stimulation. Bathing is a conure favorite and should be encouraged. When you take your conure home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. lf a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time leaving them vulnerable to illness.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

COCKATOOS

So you bought a Cockatoo. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

Cockatoos are usually kept as pets because of their charming and loving personality. These birds bond wonderfully with people and make incredible life-long companions. Cockatoos are fairly easy to train and love performing tricks when rewarded. Although they make wonderful pets, Cockatoos tend to be very loud and destructive, be aware of this before you bring your new pet home. They require a reasonable amount of attention and need to be handled often.

SOCIALIZING YOUR COCKATOO:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. Cockatoos are extremely active and require many things to chew on Be sure to always have wood available for chewing. Cockatoos should be socialized while young, with many people, toys and a variety of situations. In doing the above the Cockatoo will not have fear when introduced to a new, unfamiliar situation and will acclimate quickly.

DIET:

Many pet birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Cockatoos should be fed a mixture of pellets and large seed as a basis for good nutrition A half-cup of fruits and vegetables is recommended in addition with their daily diet. Unlike cats and dogs, birds should have table food. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

Cockatoos can be susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

HABITAT:

Choose the largest cage possible. Cockatoos are very active and need a lot of space to maneuver throughout their cage. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 4-5 toys they are very busy birds and need many toys to satisfy their inquisitive nature. Wood blocks should be provided, as they chew naturally in the wild. Toys of different materials, shapes and sizes am suggested for a variety of stimulation. When you take your Cockatoo home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing Larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

COCKATIEL

SO YOU BOUGHT A COCKATIEL. HERE ARE A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT YOUR NEW FEATHERED FRIEND

Personality

Cockatiels are wonderful companions birds. They make wonderful first pets for both the young and elderly. They are very affectionate and do not tend to bond with a single person; because of this they can often be sociable family pets. They are capable mimicry, and are excellent whistlers.

Activities & Socialization

Cockatiels should be provided with wooden blocks or toys for chewing. Bells tend to be a favorite as well. Shred-able objects are encouraged to keep the bird stimulated. Cockatiels have the ability to learn small tricks and should be rewarded when performed. Mental stimulation is critical to your birds physiological health. They will do best when kept in the liveliest room in your home. This will help build trust. BEWARE: FUMES FROM

OVERHEATING TEFLON COOKWARE CAN BE LETHAL TO BIRDS. KEEP BIRDS OUT OF DRAFTS (exp: windows, doors, ac and heater vents)

Dietary Needs

Cockatiels should be fed a mixture of both pellets and cockatiel seed. Fresh fruits and vegetables should be offered daily for physiological enrichment. Fresh foods such as broccoli, carrots, apples, and romaine lettuce are encouraged. Spray millet is entertaining and is beneficial in a young birds diet. In older birds it may be used as an occasional treat. Treats may be given in small amounts for rewards or good behavior. NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

Sexing

Mature grey males have a yellow facial area surrounding their bright orange cheek patches. Grey females will not develop the bright yellow area. Other cockatiels, depending on coloration. may be sexed at maturity by markings. Pelvic sexing is an option upon the bird’s maturity. DNA sexing is the definite.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

LOVEBIRDS

So you bought a lovebird. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

If socialized at a young age these birds can make wonderful pets for small children as well as adults. These little birds are extremely outgoing and playful. Lovebird’s have the personality of a parrot and are easily housed because of their petite size. They have an upbeat tune and chatter frequently. This breed tends to be aggressive towards other birds, despite size differences, so do not mix a lovebird with anything other than another lovebird.

SOCIALIZING YOUR LOVEBIRD:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. Lovebirds do best when kept in the liveliest room of the house. This helps them to trust you as roommates rather than predators. Lovebirds do well in groups. If you decide on a single bird, plan on it being a member of your family. Also learn to handle your lovebird; they will suffer fewer traumas during trips for grooming or medical care if they are comfortable being held by various people.

DIET:

Many pet birds die complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Lovebirds should be fed a mixture of both pellets and seed and up to 25% of their diet should consist of fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, sprouts, and millet sprays. Fresh water should be given every day. Lovebirds enjoy bathing and often dirty their drinking water. Unlike eats and does, birds should have table food. Spray millet should be given throughout their life. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

Lovebirds can be susceptible to salt poisoning: all people snacks (pretzels, chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

HABITAT:

No matter how small the bird, choose the largest cage possible, the most important dimension should be length. Birds need space to move across. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 3-4 toys. Lovebirds enjoy small balls, bells, tents, ladders, rings, plastic chain toys, and wooden toys to chew on. When you take your lovebird home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

PARAKEETS

So you bought a parakeet. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friend.

PERSONALITY:

Parakeets make great pets. They are very lively birds and enjoy many stimulating activities. Parakeets have a soft, pleasant chatter and may learn to mimic words if trained. Due to their outgoing personalities and playful mannerisms Parakeets make up for 1:an 40% of birds kept as pets.

SOCIALIZING YOUR PARAKEET:

Mental stimulation is crucial to a bird’s physiological health. Parakeets do best when kept in the liveliest room of the house. This helps them to trust you as roommates rather than predators. Parakeets do well in groups. If you decide on a single bird, plan on it being a member of your family. Also learn to handle your parakeet; they will suffer fewer traumas during trips for grooming or medical care if they are comfortable being held.

DIET:

Many pet birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds eat, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Budgies should be fed u mixture of both pellets and seed and up to 25% of their diet should consist OF fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, sprouts, and millet sprays. Unlike cats and dogs, birth should have table food. Baby parakeets benefit from additional seed, like millet and oat groats for a month or so after purchase. Treats may be given as rewards for good behavior in small amounts.

CAUTIONS:

Parakeets can be susceptible to salt poisoning; all people snacks (pretzels; chips, peanuts) should be unsalted or low-sodium. Never feed a bird from your month, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet. NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

HABITAT:

No matter how small the bird, choose the largest cage possible, the most important dimension should be length. Birds need space to move across; they will spend most of their time on the highest point of the cage, so height is not as crucial as width. Provide perches of varying thickness since birds need to exercise their flexible feet. Also include 3-4 toys. Parakeets enjoy ring toys, bells, swings, balls, mirrors, and-wooden toys to chew on. When you take your parakeet home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs. The reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

DOVES

SO YOU BOUGHT A DOVE. HERE ARE A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT YOUR NEW FEATHERED FRIEND

Personality

Doves are hardy are easy to care for. They are a good first time bird. Being good natured social creatures they do well in either a large cage or aviary. They can be kept as single or as pairs. Perhaps known for the gentle temperament, doves make great pets for the young and elderly.

Activities & Socialization

Doves need plenty of room to fly. They should be kept in cages with ample room to move. Dove do not use toys, like other companion birds. Doves should be kept in a dry environment out of extreme temperature changes. Also doves do form permanent bones to mates, and do best if mates are kept together. Female doves can lay 2 eggs every 14-16 days if a nesting box is provided. It’s not recommended that a female have more then 3-5 clutches a year. To stop breeding, remove nest box. If doves are kept indoors BEWARE OF FUMES FROM OVERHEATING TEFLON COOKWARE, IT CAN BE LETHAL TO BIRDS.

Dietary Needs

Everyday they should be offered dove seed as well as water and fruits and veggies. They also love spray millet, as well as the occasional sprinkle of corn meal or corn bread for a treat. Oyster shell should also be offered to doves, and calcium is essential for egg layers. NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

Sexing

The best way to sex a dove is to check the pelvic bone; if their pelvic bones are close together and some what pointed it is a male. If there is a space between the bones, and they are rounder,  it’s a female. Also only male doves will coo, but not all male doves coo.

BASIC CARE & GUIDELINES

FINCHES

So you bought finches. Here are a few things you should know about your feathered friends.

PERSONALITY

Naturally social birds, finches can make entertaining pets. The more room available to these birds, the better. Finches do wonderful in aviaries. These birds do well in pairs or groups. No finch should be kept alone. Though they cannot be handled, these birds can make comical pets. They are active amongst their cage and are amusing to watch. Finches are fairly hearty birds and make extraordinary pets for the elderly, since they do not require constant attention.

ACTIVITIES:

Finches enjoy bathing; a good-sized bath pan should be present in the cage or aviary.

Finches enjoy swings and canary type toys, even mirrors. When not breeding, finches still enjoy a nest to sleep in. Most manufacturers carry tents, huts and nests that would be suitable.

DIET

Many pet birds die of complications resulting from malnutrition. A diet of seed and water, what most caged birds get, is equivalent to bread and water to a person. Finches should be fed a mixture of both pellets and seed. Fresh fruits, vegetables, greens, sprouts, and millet sprays should be included in their diet as well. Unlike cats and dogs, birds should have table food. Finches benefit from additional seed such as millet throughout their life.

CAUTIONS:

Never feed a bird from your mouth, since some of the benign germs we carry can wreck havoc on a bird’s system. Be sure to NOT include the following in your bird’s diet: NO AVOCADO, ICEBERG LETTUCE, CAFFEINE OR CHOCOLATE.

HABITAT:

No matter how small the bird, choose the largest cage possible. Finches are kept in full flight and do not have hook bills to climb the cage with, they will need enough space to fly from one point to another in the cage. When choosing accessories for your cage keep in mind finches like swings, small bells, mirrors, and baths. When you take your finches home be aware of the temperature you keep your home. Birds are sensitive to drafts and chilly climates. Watch for this especially in a young bird. If a bird is cold it will fluff its feathers (appearing larger) and stay inactive for periods at a time. Beware: Fumes from overheated Teflon cookware are lethal to birds.

Most birds are hardy and adaptable once you understand their needs, the reward of your bird’s intelligent, affectionate, and entertaining companionship is well worth the attention to detail in the end

Parrotlet Information

Owning a parrotlet is a 20-30 year commitment. Give your parrotlet time out of its cage daily He depends on you to be his companion for his entire life to play with, provide toys and share affection daily

Vegetables

Provide a variety of fresh fruit, plus cooked and fresh vegetables daily. Frozen mixed vegs (peas, green beans, lima beans, carrots, corn is good). Run hot water over them until thawed. Cut up into pieces as small as possible, can add fresh broccoli, cauliflower and other vegs. Only leave these vegs and other cooked food in the cage for 1 hour as they can go bad quickly and will make your parrotlet sick.

Fruit; apples without the seeds, grapes, berries, peaches, pears, bananas, mangoes, melons, cherries without the seeds.

Seeds

A good seed mix should be available at all times. A cockatail mix with few sunflower seeds is good, or a seed mix for small hook bills without sunflower seeds. Millet spray.

Cooked brown rice, beans, pasta and sprouted seeds can be mixed in with the vegs regularly.

Food they were raised on and fed daily:

Morning: Soak and cook bean mix, (beans, wheat, peas)

Greens: carrot greens, parsley, spinach.

Fruits: peaches, strawberries, kiwi, plums, pitted cherries.

Evening- Brown cooks rice, fresh or frozen vegetables all types cut up in small pieces, egg food. Beak Appetit ( Petsmart, Petco).

All day. Small hook bill seed. Millet spray, fresh water (bottled or filtered), cuttlebone and mineral cake.

No salt, chocolate, avocados, apple seeds, cherry pits.

Poisonous Plants that are Harmful to Birds

 

Amaryllis     Avocado     Azalea     Balsam Pear     Baneberry     Beans: Castor, Horse, Peas Navy, Glory     Bird Of Paradise     Black Locust     Blue-Green Algae     Boxwood    Calla Lily     Cherry Tree     Christmas Candle     Coral Plant     Daffodil     Dieffenbachia     Eggplant     Elephant’s Ear     Foxglove     Hemlock      Holly     Hyacinth     Hydrangea      Indian Turnip     Iris     Ivy **All Types     Java Bean      Jerusulem Cherry     Jimsonweed      Juniper     Larkspur    Lily of the Valley     Lobelia     Locoweed     Marijuana     Mayapple     Mistletoe      Mock Orange     Morning Glory     Narcissus      Oak     Oleander     Philodendron     Poison Ivy & Oak     Poinsettia     Pikeweed     Potato     Privet     Rhododendron     Rhubarb     Rosary Peas     Sandbox Tree     Skunk Cabbage     Snowdrop     Sweet Pea     Tobacco     Virginia Creeper     Wisteria     Yam Bean     Yew

 

Sources of Fumes that are Toxic to Birds

 

Asbestos     Bleach Chlorine     Carbon Monoxide     Cigarette Smoke     Diazanon     Flea Bombs and Collars     Floor Polishes     Formaldehyde     Hair Dye and Spray House Paint     Kerosene     Matches     Moth Balls     Nail Polish & Remover Oil Paint     Oven Cleaner     Overheated Nonstick     Cookware Teflons     Paint Remover     Perfume     Permanent Wave Solution Pesticides     Shoe Polish and Cleaners Spot Removers     Spray Starch      Suntan Lotions       Surgical Acrylics        Toilet Cleaners      Wax

 

**This is by no means a complete list. If you are unsure, read the label, seek more information from maker. When in doubt, don’t use!

VETERINARIANS:

Dr. Sigdestad  (909) 825-3144

Dr. Ann McDowell  (909) 625-1561 (Clermont)

Dr. Larry Nemetz  (714) 633-2910 (Orange) www.thebirdclinic.com

Dr. Todd Kopit  (714) 828-5891 (Stanton)

Dr. Attila Molnar  (818) 591-2773 (Calabasas)

Dr. Tiffany Margolin  (805) 497-4900

For after hour emergencies: Yorba Regional Animal Hospital (714) 921-8700 (Yorba Linda)

So you found a baby bird. What to do?

  1. Look around for the parents. If parents are around, try to put the bird back into the nest if you can reach it. (Birds will not reject their babies if you touch them. That’s for rabbits!) Crows are quite awkward when they first fledge and may be just learning how to fly and land, so if parents are around it is best to just let them be. Crows need their parents to learn survival skills. Hand-raised crows generally cannot survive when released into the wild, so raising a baby crow means they will be doomed to live with humans or die.
  2. If you can’t find the parents and the baby can’t fly, put the baby in a quiet dark box and take it to someone who rehabilitates injured and infant birds. You can find a rehabber by going to CCWR.org. (California Council of Wildlife Rehabilitators.) It is best to let a well-trained licensed rehabilitation expert raise the baby, if you can find such a person. The reason is that you can make a mistake that will injure or kill the bird. Baby birds given insufficient diets can become permanently crippled. Calcium deficiencies in mockingbirds, for example, will lead to a bird that can’t stand up.
  3. While you are looking for a rehabilitator, you should keep the bird quiet, warm and mostly in the dark. If you can’t find someone right away, you will have to feed the bird. A baby bird will open its mouth very wide (gape) for food. It is tempting to give the baby water, but DON’T DO THIS! THE BABY WILL PROBABLY ASPIRATE THE WATER INTO ITS LUNGS AND DIE IF YOU DO SO. You can give most baby birds some soaked cat or dog food (or canned dog food) and scrambled egg. Baby bird formula (called “Exact”) is available at Bracken Bird Farm or Petsmart. It works well to mix this formula with some meat baby food. You can use a syringe (lcc or 3cc) to deliver this formula to the back of the bird’s mouth.

If you have found an injured adult bird:

  1. Be careful not to get hurt! If the bird is a predator type such as a hawk or owl, you may be able to safely pick up the bird by first placing a large towel or blanket over the bird. Wear gloves and be watchful, as adult birds can bite and peck your face!
  2. As with babies, contact a rehabilitator and turn the bird over to them for care. If you can’t find someone to accept the bird, you can take the injured bird to a veterinarian for evaluation. (Dr. Sidgestadt at Loma Linda Animal Hospital will see wild birds and other injured wildlife. 909- 825-3144) Some species (sparrows, starlings and crows) are considered “pests” and it may be impossible to find someone who will take the bird. If you cannot find a rehabilitator and you decide to try to take care of the bird during its recovery be sure to learn about the needs of the bird. It may be more humane to euthanize an adult bird who can never be released than to keep it, as adult wild birds may never adjust to life with us humans.